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04-Apr-2017 20:51

Diana and Steve’s conversation in the boat scene touches on some pretty fundamental aspects of our day to day lives — namely, sex and reproduction.

It's hilarious that Diana is so blunt about these subjects whilst Steve awkwardly tiptoes around them, as he ultimately fails to provide satisfactory answers to her questions.

Wonder Woman and the Amazons have been depicted as queer in the comics for some time, which means that Diana’s line about pleasure without men can definitely be read as a hint towards the Amazons sexually gratifying each other.

Admittedly though, aside from several fairly pointed hints like this, there’s no concrete evidence that cinematic Themyscira has any LGBT relationships, meaning that Wonder Woman is sadly another movie where LGBT characters are buried in ambiguous subtext.

Certainly, there is quite a lot that Diana and Steve have in common; as the film progresses, we realize that both characters are outsiders in some shape or form.

Diana and Steve are also skilled combatants, and the two of them share a passion for justice — even if their methods and outlook do vary somewhat.

The DCEU’s Diana remains a strong independent woman who only needs a man to help her negotiate the unfamiliar terrain of early 20th Century Europe so she can confront the God of War.

She sticks with Steve because she values his input, relating to him as a person, and not just because he’s a beefcake of a man that she wants to "try out," as it were.

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Yet as Wonder Woman shows, Diana is more mature and astute than your average cinematic heroine, and doesn't need that kind of help from anybody.In particular, fans have found the optimism that’s borne through her fight with Ares to be a welcome light in the pervading grimness of the #DCEU. The scene in question is the beginning of Diana (#Gal Gadot) and Steve’s (#Chris Pine) long boat ride to London.Yet moviegoers have also responded to how empowering the film is; the No Man’s Land assault is already becoming a pivotal moment in superhero movie history, but the film also contains another, less-discussed scene that’s just as key to understanding the ethos of Wonder Woman. Up until this point in the film, the peculiarity of Steve’s arrival, the brutal German attack and Diana’s theft of the God-Killer sword have meant that they haven’t had chance to get properly acquainted.We might laugh at how Steve reacts to being broadsided by this information, but beneath the laughter, there’s an undercurrent of something more.After all, the fact that specifically men are labelled as unnecessary is very telling; though Clio’s fictional teachings are at odds with scholars of the time period, it’s heavily implied that Diana is pretty self-sufficient where sexual pleasure is concerned.

Yet as Wonder Woman shows, Diana is more mature and astute than your average cinematic heroine, and doesn't need that kind of help from anybody.

In particular, fans have found the optimism that’s borne through her fight with Ares to be a welcome light in the pervading grimness of the #DCEU. The scene in question is the beginning of Diana (#Gal Gadot) and Steve’s (#Chris Pine) long boat ride to London.

Yet moviegoers have also responded to how empowering the film is; the No Man’s Land assault is already becoming a pivotal moment in superhero movie history, but the film also contains another, less-discussed scene that’s just as key to understanding the ethos of Wonder Woman. Up until this point in the film, the peculiarity of Steve’s arrival, the brutal German attack and Diana’s theft of the God-Killer sword have meant that they haven’t had chance to get properly acquainted.

We might laugh at how Steve reacts to being broadsided by this information, but beneath the laughter, there’s an undercurrent of something more.

After all, the fact that specifically men are labelled as unnecessary is very telling; though Clio’s fictional teachings are at odds with scholars of the time period, it’s heavily implied that Diana is pretty self-sufficient where sexual pleasure is concerned.

Since she's from a different, all-female society where norms and divisions of this kind don't exist, its only fitting that Diana can challenge our accepted ideas, since she has a fresh, alternative perspective on gender politics.