Radioisotope dating video

29-Nov-2016 06:53

That’s logical because the sediment making up that layer was deposited on top of, and therefore after, the layers below.

So reading this diagram tells us basic information about the time that rock layers and rock units were formed relative to other layers.

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It is immediately apparent that the ages for each rock unit do not agree.

So it is possible that relative radioactive ages of rocks, in addition to mineral contents and other rock features, could be used to compare and correlate similar rocks in other areas to find which ones formed at the same time during the events detailed in Genesis, God’s eyewitness account of earth history. How could recently discovered dinosaur tissue have survived until today?

Why is the first fossil layer filled with such an astonishing variety of life (“the Cambrian Explosion”)?

So how do we explain that they have each recorded different ages? Each of the radioactive elements must have decayed at different, faster rates in the past!

In the case of the Cardenas Basalt, while the potassium-argon clock ticked through 516 million years, two other clocks ticked through 1,111 million years and 1,588 million years.

It is immediately apparent that the ages for each rock unit do not agree.So it is possible that relative radioactive ages of rocks, in addition to mineral contents and other rock features, could be used to compare and correlate similar rocks in other areas to find which ones formed at the same time during the events detailed in Genesis, God’s eyewitness account of earth history. How could recently discovered dinosaur tissue have survived until today?Why is the first fossil layer filled with such an astonishing variety of life (“the Cambrian Explosion”)?So how do we explain that they have each recorded different ages? Each of the radioactive elements must have decayed at different, faster rates in the past!In the case of the Cardenas Basalt, while the potassium-argon clock ticked through 516 million years, two other clocks ticked through 1,111 million years and 1,588 million years.Part Two of this series showed that the same rocks can yield very different ages, depending on which radiometric dating technique you use.