Real dating databases for sale

13-Nov-2017 20:58

Organizations wanting to jump in in a big way can build as sophisticated a database as you could dream of with an industrial-strength program such as Fox Pro, Paradox, or the newer generation of programs such as Microsoft Access.If you know your way around databases, pick whichever program you're most comfortable with.It might be useful to have a first name-last name division, but even that's not really necessary - and there's at least one compelling reason why it's better to keep it all as a single field. Other programs (like Panorama on the Mac) have a feature they call "clairvoyance." You type the first two or three letters of the word and it fills in the rest, based on what you filled in earlier in that field.Many of the contributors you'll be entering are not individuals, but organizations - whether PACs, unions, or corporations. Another thing you can do is skip the field as you're entering the records, then fill in a block of them later, through cutting and pasting or a simple replicate command.Anyone, with even the smallest of computers and the most rudimentary of database programs, can put together a database.No fancy equipment is needed, and the work can be done (if there's no support from editors) in odd hours of the day, or nights and weekends.Of all the bits of data, this is probably the most important, since it's the one you'll use later to assign an industry or interest group code to the contribution.If your state requires this information, be sure to include extra fields for them in your database.

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Once you've got your database structure, you're ready to start entering data. It's likely to be one of the most complicated and time-consuming fields to enter, but it will be very useful later when you're trying to link spouses and children with the income-earner in the family. out-of-state contribution totals, for example, or compiling a list of the golden zip codes with the deepest political pockets.

A few comments on some of the fields are in order here: Contributor's name. The city and state fields in particular are ones that will be repeated over and over again, so look for a database program that will allow you to "repeat" the entry from the previous record automatically.

The traditional way to store names in computer databases is to break the name up into at least two, and possibly several fields: first name, last name, middle initial, prefix, suffix, etc. Based on my own experience at working with these databases, I'd give a qualified no. (In other words, if you've got 25 contributions in a row from "Los Angeles," let the computer fill it in when you tab to the city field.

Let's assume you have all the standard elements on the paper records you're working with.

Here's a workable structure you can use to get started.

Once you've got your database structure, you're ready to start entering data. It's likely to be one of the most complicated and time-consuming fields to enter, but it will be very useful later when you're trying to link spouses and children with the income-earner in the family. out-of-state contribution totals, for example, or compiling a list of the golden zip codes with the deepest political pockets.A few comments on some of the fields are in order here: Contributor's name. The city and state fields in particular are ones that will be repeated over and over again, so look for a database program that will allow you to "repeat" the entry from the previous record automatically.The traditional way to store names in computer databases is to break the name up into at least two, and possibly several fields: first name, last name, middle initial, prefix, suffix, etc. Based on my own experience at working with these databases, I'd give a qualified no. (In other words, if you've got 25 contributions in a row from "Los Angeles," let the computer fill it in when you tab to the city field.Let's assume you have all the standard elements on the paper records you're working with.Here's a workable structure you can use to get started.Kentucky requires statewide candidates to disclose the name and employer of the contributor's spouse (an excellent way of identifying the economic interests behind what otherwise would be a contribution from a "housewife" or "homemaker").