Shroud of turin and carbon 14 dating new york dating east meets west

14-Jun-2016 12:32

The author dismisses 1988 carbon-14 dating tests which concluded that the linen sheet was a medieval fake.

The shroud, which bears the faint image of a blood-covered man, is believed by some to be Christ's burial cloth.

"The radiocarbon sample has completely different chemical properties than the main part of the shroud relic," said Mr Rogers, who is a retired chemist from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, US.

Fire damage He says he was originally dubious of untested claims that the 1988 sample was taken from a re-weave.

"This stuff was manipulated - it was coloured on purpose." In the study, he analysed and compared the sample used in the 1988 tests with other samples from the famous cloth.

In addition to the discovery of dye, microchemical tests - which use tiny quantities of materials - provided a way to date the shroud.

That led to the then Cardinal of Turin, Anastasio Alberto Ballestrero, admitting the garment was a hoax.

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"The radiocarbon sample cannot be older than about AD 1290, agreeing with the age determined in 1988.

It is said to have been restored by nuns who patched the holes and stitched the shroud to a reinforcing material known as the Holland cloth.

"[The radiocarbon sample] has obvious painting medium, a dye and a mordant that doesn't show anywhere else," Mr Rogers explained.

Raymond Rogers says his research and chemical tests show the material used in the 1988 radiocarbon analysis was cut from a medieval patch woven into the shroud to repair fire damage.

It was this material that was responsible for an invalid date being assigned to the original shroud cloth, he argues.

"The radiocarbon sample cannot be older than about AD 1290, agreeing with the age determined in 1988.It is said to have been restored by nuns who patched the holes and stitched the shroud to a reinforcing material known as the Holland cloth."[The radiocarbon sample] has obvious painting medium, a dye and a mordant that doesn't show anywhere else," Mr Rogers explained.Raymond Rogers says his research and chemical tests show the material used in the 1988 radiocarbon analysis was cut from a medieval patch woven into the shroud to repair fire damage.It was this material that was responsible for an invalid date being assigned to the original shroud cloth, he argues."A determination of the kinetics of vanillin loss suggests the shroud is between 1,300 and 3,000 years old." In the 1988 study, scientists from three universities concluded that the cloth dated from some time between 12.