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09-Apr-2017 07:23

Gary, Indiana, was founded in 1906 by the United States Steel Corporation as the home for its new plant, Gary Works.The city was named after lawyer Elbert Henry Gary, who was the founding chairman of the United States Steel Corporation.Several of the East Side's most notable buildings were Memorial Auditorium (a large red-brick and stone civic auditorium and the site of numerous events, concerts and graduations) The Palace Theater, Emerson School, St. This side of town was known for its masonry or brick residences, its taller and larger commercial buildings, including the Gary National Bank Building, Hotel Gary (now Genesis Towers), The Knights of Columbus Hotel & Building (now a seniors building fronting 5th Avenue), the Tivoli Theater (demolished), the U. Post Office, Main Library, Mercy and Methodist Hospitals and Holy Angels Cathedral and School.The West Side also had a secondary principal street, Fifth Avenue which was lined with many commercial businesses, restaurants, theaters, tall buildings and elegant apartment buildings.Gary was the site of civil unrest in the Steel Strike of 1919. Shortly thereafter, over 4,000 federal troops under the command of Major General Leonard Wood arrived to restore order.On October 4, 1919, a riot broke out on Broadway, the main north-south street through downtown Gary, between striking steel workers and strike breakers brought in from outside. The jobs offered by the steel industry provided Gary with very rapid growth and a diverse population within the first 26 years of its founding.making it the ninth-largest city in the state of Indiana.

It was a beautiful area of single-family houses with repeating house designs alternating from one street to another, some streets looking very similar. Gordon & Sons and Goldblatt's Department Stores, in addition to the Fair Department Store all fronting Broadway at the main street that divided Gary, much like State Street and Madison Streets divides Chicago's North, South, West and East Sides. The West Side of Gary, or West of Broadway, the principal commercial street, had streets named after the presidents of the United States in order of their election.

In the 1960s, like many other American urban centers reliant on one particular industry, Gary entered a spiral of decline. Non-whites were primarily restricted to live in the Midtown section just south of downtown (per the 1950 Census, 97% of the black population of Gary was living in this neighborhood).

Gary's decline was brought on by the growing overseas competitiveness in the steel industry, which had caused U. Gary had one of the nation's first African-American mayors, Richard G.

Broadway was known as a commercial center for the region. Steel Gary Works employed over 30,000 in 1970, declined to just 6,000 by 1990, and further declined to 5,100 in August 2015. Rapid racial change occurred in Gary during the late 20th century.

Department stores and architecturally significant movie houses were built in the downtown area and the Glen Park neighborhood. These population changes resulted in political change which reflected the racial demographics of Gary: the non-white share of the city's population increased from 21% in 1930, 39% in 1960, to 53% in 1970.

It was a beautiful area of single-family houses with repeating house designs alternating from one street to another, some streets looking very similar. Gordon & Sons and Goldblatt's Department Stores, in addition to the Fair Department Store all fronting Broadway at the main street that divided Gary, much like State Street and Madison Streets divides Chicago's North, South, West and East Sides. The West Side of Gary, or West of Broadway, the principal commercial street, had streets named after the presidents of the United States in order of their election.In the 1960s, like many other American urban centers reliant on one particular industry, Gary entered a spiral of decline. Non-whites were primarily restricted to live in the Midtown section just south of downtown (per the 1950 Census, 97% of the black population of Gary was living in this neighborhood).Gary's decline was brought on by the growing overseas competitiveness in the steel industry, which had caused U. Gary had one of the nation's first African-American mayors, Richard G.Broadway was known as a commercial center for the region. Steel Gary Works employed over 30,000 in 1970, declined to just 6,000 by 1990, and further declined to 5,100 in August 2015. Rapid racial change occurred in Gary during the late 20th century.Department stores and architecturally significant movie houses were built in the downtown area and the Glen Park neighborhood. These population changes resulted in political change which reflected the racial demographics of Gary: the non-white share of the city's population increased from 21% in 1930, 39% in 1960, to 53% in 1970.After exiting from the race, Clay endorsed rival Karen Freeman-Wilson, who won the Democratic mayoral primary in May.